Page to Screen: An Introduction

By Joe Strange


 

The Hunger Games, Divergent, 50 Shades of Grey, all these things have something in common, aside from a female protagonist, and that’s that all three of them have a film coming out next year, and that they were all originally books.

More films than ever are adaptations of successful or at least, popular books or other source material. Transformers brought in the slew of films based on toy lines, Real Steel was Rock ’em Sock ’em Robots with Wolverine, and Battlships was er, Battleships with er, Rihanna. And while I could talk for hours about those films, I’m actually going to be talking for hours about the first selection of films.

Page to Screen is something that I’ve wanted to do for a while; a series of articles addressing the art of taking a book, a somewhat subjective experience where everyone imagines everything slightly differently, and turning it into a film that solidifies a particular person’s version as ‘canon’.

Now more than ever we have more than enough examples of both excellent adaptations and not so excellent adaptations, and with the trend showing no sign of stopping, it seemed like the time for me to get started.

Over the next few weeks I’ll be addressing the good and the bad of the medium, and as an avid fan of both books and films, taking a look at what I consider to be the key facets of the adaptation process. Tackling what can be done to avoid some of the pitfalls that we’ve seen in the past and celebrating what has been done very well.

Now I’ve already mentioned that I won’t be addressing the toy line adaptations of films, but I will be addressing in some parts comic books and graphic novels. Something that I don’t think I can avoid considering the influence both of these have on the film industry at the moment.

So that’s an introduction to the series that you’ll be seeing over the next few Fridays, come back next week when we’ll kick it all off big with one of the most important parts of the move from book to film; Characters.

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